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The name's Yvonne, how do you do? Just a 20-something trying to get through life. Started with the intent of artistic endeavors but got sidetracked with reblogs. Lover of creative things, equality, Doctor Who and A:TLA. She'd love to hear from you!

yamino:

yeahwriters:

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referenceforwriters:

Hemingway App

thetrolliestcritic:

Hemingway makes your writing bold and clear. 

Basically the coolest little tool to have as a writer.

This is awesome!!!

Hmm! I will try this later.

My boyfriend and I have been together for about 2 years. It’s been an interesting ride, but a lovely one. For us starting off as unexpectedly as we did (a story for another time), we have a good amount in common. ….But we do have plenty of differences. For example, he’s an avid gamer whereas I’ve only touched “Bejeweled” and “Dead or Alive 2”. He’s most comfortable in nature and the woods while I love the hustle and bustle of the city. He likes the simple things while I aim for the ornate.

…Oh, and he’s a White American and I’m a Black Ghanaian-American.

I wrote a thing! Check it out!

yeahwriters:

wrote-miss-ibis:

totalrewrite:

Formatting your Manuscript

If you’re planning on one day turning your manuscript in to literary agents and publishing houses, you need to make sure it’s formatted correctly. In many cases, your manuscript will be skipped over if it isn’t done to industry standard, so here’s the basics that you’ll need if you don’t want to be ignored. Before I get started, please know that this is aimed specifically at fiction manuscripts. If you’re writing non-fiction or a memoir, the expectations will be different, so it would be wise to Google what you need.

The Basics

  • Make sure your font is 12 point Times New Roman, Courier New, or Arial. These are the only three fonts you are allowed to pick from.
  • Your spacing should be 1 inch on all sides of the text. This is the default on most word processors, but double check your settings just to be sure.
  • Your text should be double spaced.
  • All of your indentations must be a half inch. Do not press indent. Instead, drag over the top arrow on the ruler to have every new paragraph automatically indent.

The Title Page

  • The top left-hand corner of your title page will have all your personal information. They want to see your name, address, phone number, e-mail address, the novel’s genre, and word count.

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  • Your novel’s title is allowed to be between 20-24 point font if you want. Bold is also an option, but not necessary.
  • The title will appear halfway down the title page.
  • “A novel by [your name]” will be about three quarters of the way down the page.

The Next Pages

  • If you have a dedication, it will be on its own page.
  • If you have some sort of verse or quote, those will also need their own pages.
  • Do not include a page for acknowledgements.

The Chapters

  • Chapter titles will be 12 point font. No bolding or italics.
  • Chapters will start from one quarter to halfway down the page.
  • An easy way to format chapter headings is to press enter five or six times
  • Make sure you always start your chapters the same way every time.
  • When you start a new chapter, make sure you use a page break to bump the new chapter onto a new page. This will keep it in place so that it will never budge, no matter how much you cut out or add to the previous chapter.

Page Numbers

  • Page numbers will start with 1 on Chapter 1 of your manuscript. Page numbers will not appear on the title page or dedication page.
  • Page 1 will be labeled in the footer of Chapter 1. It should be centered.
  • Page 2 will be in the header of the next page.
  • From page 2 onward, your headers will be labeled like this:

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  • If you insert a section break after the title and dedication pages, it will make it easier to insert the page numbers.

For the most part, this is the most important of what you’ll need to know for formatting your manuscript. I used this video as reference, so I’m trusting everything it says is true because it was made by an author who has several novels published, and because it was uploaded this year, it should be up to date.

But just remember, whenever you go to turn in a manuscript, make sure you check the website of the agent or publisher you’re trying to contact. They might have specifications that differ with the ones stated in this video, and you should always do whatever you can to abide by what they want.

Reblogging aggressively. Some publishers will throw your manuscript into the slush pile or, worse, the trash if you don’t follow their desired format. Spec fic publishers are especially strict about manuscript formatting.

Also reblogging aggressively.

swankivy:

At Least You’re Not Me: new webcomic at So You Write.

So I promised every tenth comic would be long. I didn’t think they’d be this long, though.

This of course refers to how J.K. Rowling pseudonymously wrote a book called The Cuckoo’s Calling under the name Robert Galbraith. She claimed she wanted to do so because she “was yearning to go back to the beginning of a writing career in this new genre, to work without hype or expectation and to receive totally unvarnished feedback.”

She had already tried once to release a book unrelated to the Harry Potter series with her adult novel The Casual Vacancy, but of course she couldn’t escape comparisons to her previous work and complaints about not living up to whatever people expected.

In releasing The Cuckoo’s Calling pseudonymously, with even the publisher who accepted it not knowing that it wasn’t really by a man named Robert Galbraith, Rowling got to prove that she really could do this, that it wasn’t a fluke, that everything else she does isn’t just riding on her own coattails. But the book didn’t sell fantastically–it sold better than she’d expected, but there was no huge explosion until the real author was revealed.

She wishes she hadn’t had to admit she is Robert Galbraith. I guess even being one of the biggest authors ever has its drawbacks.

So, for the past 2 weeks, I’ve been revamping and adding an ending to this Christmas play I wrote, in hopes that it’ll get performed this December. Listening to the soundtrack I picked out while thinking makes me wish it was snowing already.

"Every first draft is perfect, because all a first draft has to do is exist."

Jane Smiley (via inspired-to-write)

Somehow this is the most inspiring thing I’ve read in a long time. I’m going to go write now.

(via joleebindo)

firefly-in-the-night answered your question: So, Ive been thinking; I originally started this…

I would love to read your writing!

lanegrabarbuda answered your question: So, Ive been thinking; I originally started this…

Its up to you! Do what you feel!

fromacacia replied to your post: So, Ive been thinking; I originally started this…

PUT IT ON HERE NOWWWWWWWAAAAAAH!

inmyhead16 replied to your post: So, Ive been thinking; I originally started this…

do it!

So you guys are actually really overwhelming (in a brilliantly good way)

So here’s my game plan: I’ll post my writing on here. BUT, it will be reblogged from a tumblr I will make exclusively dedicated to my writing. Mostly because I want stuff I write to be easy to find and not lost in reblogs. so as soon as i can figure out a name for the new blog, it’s gonna happen. Your support is amazing; thanks! ^_^

So, I’ve been thinking; I originally started this tumblr some two odd years ago so I could practice writing. As you can see, I have drifted from that. But I want to wriiiiiiiiiiite, and I hate that I’m keeping it to myself.

So

Question for my followers: Would you be interested if I posted some short stories, editorial writing, and other written works on here? (or should I just make a new tumblr?)


read once all the way through, then read it excluding the words in parentheses, and then read only the words in parentheses.

read once all the way through, then read it excluding the words in parentheses, and then read only the words in parentheses.

chalkdustswirls:

Writer Chinua Achebe of Nigeria died this week at 82. Achebe wrote novels (including “Things Fall Apart”) as well as essays and poetry, most if not all of which touched on his homeland (especially issues of colonization, power and culture).
I love his response, in an interview with Paris Review, as to why he did not teach creative writing:

Well, I don’t know how it’s done. I mean it. I really don’t know. The only thing I can say for it is that it provides work for writers. Don’t laugh! It’s very important. I think it’s very important for writers who need something else to do, especially in these precarious times. Many writers can’t make a living. So to be able to teach how to write is valuable to them. But I don’t really know about its value to the student. I don’t mean it’s useless. But I wouldn’t have wanted anyone to teach me how to write. That’s my own taste. I prefer to stumble on it. I prefer to go on trying all kinds of things, not to be told, This is the way it is done. 

chalkdustswirls:

Writer Chinua Achebe of Nigeria died this week at 82. Achebe wrote novels (including “Things Fall Apart”) as well as essays and poetry, most if not all of which touched on his homeland (especially issues of colonization, power and culture).

I love his response, in an interview with Paris Review, as to why he did not teach creative writing:

Well, I don’t know how it’s done. I mean it. I really don’t know. The only thing I can say for it is that it provides work for writers. Don’t laugh! It’s very important. I think it’s very important for writers who need something else to do, especially in these precarious times. Many writers can’t make a living. So to be able to teach how to write is valuable to them. But I don’t really know about its value to the student. I don’t mean it’s useless. But I wouldn’t have wanted anyone to teach me how to write. That’s my own taste. I prefer to stumble on it. I prefer to go on trying all kinds of things, not to be told, This is the way it is done. 

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